Kale: One of the World’s Most Nutritious Vegetables

KaleKale is a form of wild cabbage with green or purple leaves, and which was one of the most common green vegetables in Europe until the latter part of the Middle Ages. It grows well into winter, and some growers even claim that it tastes sweeter when subjected to frost. Cooked kale is a popular addition to potato and meat-based dishes, through – like all leafy green vegetables – it can also be eaten raw.

Kale is considered one of the most nutritious, if not the most nutritious, vegetables in the world. In this article, we’ll find out exactly why some researchers believe that kale surpasses even broccoli in the health department.

List of Health Benefits

Rich in vitamin K – One cup of chopped kale (67 grams) contains a whopping 547 micrograms of vitamin K, which is 684 percent of an adult’s recommended daily intake (RDI). Vitamin K is a fat-soluble compound that controls bleeding, including blood clotting. It also ensures that we develop strong and healthy bones, thereby preventing osteoporosis and bone fractures. Symptoms of a vitamin K deficiency include bleeding gums, bleeding noses, and blood in the stools or urine.

High in vitamin A – One cup of kale contains 10,302 international units of vitamin A, which is 206 percent of our RDI. Vitamin A is mostly associated with animal products, but plant-based sources of it – called carotenoids – are also found in the most nutritious vegetables. Carotenoids (of which beta-carotene is perhaps the best-known) primarily function as antioxidants, and provide numerous benefits to our eyes, skin, and immune system. They also contain anti-aging properties.

Good source of vitamin C – The third and final vitamin in which kale is unusually high is vitamin C, another antioxidant that guards us from degenerative diseases such as cancer and macular degeneration. One cup of kale contains 80.4 milligrams of vitamin C, which is 134 percent of our RDI.

Detoxification and weight loss properties – Kale contains high amounts of sulfur and dietary fiber. Sulfur is actually the third most abundant mineral in the body (after calcium and phosphorous), and aids fat digestion and absorption, the production of bile acids, and the regulation of blood sugar. Fiber, on the other hand, sweeps the large intestine of accumulated waste (including cancer-causing toxins, to which it binds itself as it passes). Aside from being great detoxifiers, sulfur and fiber also stimulate weight loss. This fact, coupled with its low calorie and fat content, makes kale an effective weight loss food.

A powerful anti-inflammatory – One cup of kale contains 121 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids and 92.4 milligrams of omega-6 fatty acids. These essential, polyunsaturated fats contain anti-inflammatory properties (meaning they can reduce inflammation, including the effects of auto-inflammatory diseases such as asthma, IBS, and Alzheimer’s disease), and support brain function.

Good plant-based source of iron and calcium – Per calorie, kale contains more iron than beef and more calcium than milk, making it a great source of both minerals for individuals who avoid meat and/or dairy foods. We need iron to build hemoglobin, which transports oxygen from our lungs to the body’s cells (and can lead to anemia when deficient). We need calcium, of course, to build strong bones and teeth. A chronic deficiency in calcium can result in osteoporosis, arthritis, and other painful bone conditions.

Additional nutrients – One cup of kale also provides us with trace minerals such as magnesium (6 percent of our RDI), phosphorous (4 percent), potassium (9 percent), zinc (2 percent), copper (10 percent), and manganese (26 percent), which aid our body’s day-to-day processes. It also contains B vitamins such as thiamin, niacin, and pantothenic acid, which help us metabolize energy from the foods we eat.

Uses for Kale

Though kale can be eaten raw, most people prefer to cook it and serve it with hot meals. Kale is surprisingly versatile; while it can simply be steamed and added to meat dishes, it can also be added to stir fries, salads, vegetable sautes, soups, and pasta and noodle dishes. It’s important to remember that adding oils and lemon juice to kale noticeably reduces its intense flavor, which is either a positive thing or a negative thing depending on your taste buds.

 

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