Blackstrap Molasses Can Improve Hair Growth and Color

Graying HairBlackstrap molasses has been receiving a lot of attention in the natural health world of late, and for good reason. This nutritious grade of molasses, which is the thick, syrup-like byproduct of the sugar cane refinement process, is absolutely packed with essential minerals that are seldom found in such high concentrations elsewhere. For this reason, blackstrap makes a robust and inexpensive health supplement that can correct many nutrient deficiencies in the body.

One benefit of blackstrap molasses that deserves particular attention, however, is its positive impact upon our hair. Though no scientific research has been conducted on this issue, the anecdotal evidence surrounding it is so overwhelming that it cannot be ignored.

How Blackstrap Benefits Our Hair

There are two reasons why blackstrap molasses is so good for our hair. Firstly, many of the minerals found in blackstrap, such as selenium, manganese, and zinc, are antioxidants which, due to their free radical-scavenging abilities, are well-known for their anti-aging benefits. In fact, one of the most immediately noticeable benefits of regular blackstrap consumption is softer and smoother skin and hair.

Secondly, one tablespoon of blackstrap contains 20 percent of our recommended daily intake of the essential trace mineral copper. Though copper is toxic in high quantities, it does perform several important functions in the body when consumed in moderation – including helping the body to produce melanin, the pigment responsible for hair color. This copper content is the reason why so many people, including elderly people, find that their hair returns to its original color after long-term blackstrap consumption. Some men have even found that blackstrap molasses can stimulate hair regrowth!

How to Use the Molasses

There are two ways to use blackstrap molasses for hair-improving purposes. The first and most popular way is to simply take it as a health supplement. Every day, mix one or two tablespoons of organic, unsulphured blackstrap molasses (sulphured blackstrap contains fewer nutrients) into a cup of boiling water and drink the mixture once it has cooled. Though some people report immediate benefits to their hair within weeks, it usually takes months of regular consumption before the most significant improvements – such as color restoration and regrowth – start to manifest.

Alternatively, you could use blackstrap molasses as a shampoo. Anyone who has dealt with molasses before will understand why this is not an appealing option, but it does work. To do so, apply some blackstrap that has been partially diluted with water to the scalp and allow it to sit for 15 minutes. This will allow the molasses’ many nutrients to nourish and rejuvenate the hair follicles. Finally, wash it off with warm water. Consider mixing the blackstrap with other hair-friendly ingredients, such as coconut milk or saw palmetto, to accelerate the process.

 

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