Fruits and Vegetables Often Resemble the Organs They Benefit

Walnut BrainThe doctrine of signatures is an ancient herbalist philosophy attributed to Paracelsus (1491-1541) and later popularized by the German shoemaker Jakob Bohme (1575-1624). It states that all fruits and vegetables share aesthetic properties or “signatures” with the organ they benefit. While allopathic medicine has attempted to write off the doctrine as superstition, studies have repeatedly shown that its core principles are true. The kidney bean, for example, not only resembles a kidney in shape and color, but also helps to maintain kidney functioning when regularly consumed. Let’s take a look at some other examples.

Walnuts – Brain

With its two hemispheres, cranium-like shell, and knotted folds, the common walnut looks like the human brain on many levels – and the brain is exactly what it benefits. Walnuts are the only nut that contains large amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, which help to prevent cognitive decline since mammalian brains are composed of, and require, the exact same acids.

Grapes – Lungs

Bunched grapes closely resemble the branches of alveoli that comprise our lungs, and which allow oxygen to pass from the lungs to the bloodstream. Grapes are proven to reduce the risk of lung cancer, and the chemical proanthocyanidin – present in grape seeds – can minimize the risk of allergy-related asthma.

Tomatoes – Heart

Like the human heart, tomatoes are red and usually contain four chambers when sliced. They are an unbeatable source of lycopene, a plant chemical that helps prevent coronary heart disease and which neutralizes the harmful effects of LDL cholesterol. Furthermore, tomatoes are rich in folate, which aids the production of oxygen-carrying red blood cells – the very cells that the heart pumps around the body.

Carrots – Eyes

A sliced carrot strongly resembles the human eye, even down to the complex pattern of the iris. Is nature telling us something? Carrots are extremely rich in beta-carotene, a plant chemical that minimizes the chances of contacting cataracts and developing age-related macular degeneration (a common eye condition that affects approximately 25 percent of individuals above the age of 65).

Avocados – Womb

The womb-shaped avocado takes approximately nine months to grow from blossom to ripened fruit, and contains an unusually large seed (“baby”) in its center. Eating avocados helps to stabilize female hormones, remove excess birth weight, and prevent cervical cancer.

Figs – Testicles

If avocados were designed for female health, then the testicle-shaped figs were surely designed for male health. These sweet fruits hang in pairs, are protected by a delicate skin, and when sliced, reveal thousands of stringy white seeds. Figs are known to increase sperm count and sperm mobility, and can help men overcome sterility.

Other Examples

Mushrooms – A sliced mushroom strongly resembles the human ear. Incidentally, they are also one of the few vegetables that contains vitamin D, which helps to prevent tinnitus and hearing loss.

Celery – Celery sticks contain identical amounts of sodium (23 percent) to the bones they resemble. Like calcium – which celery also contains in high amounts – sodium is essential for healthy bones.

Ginger – A piece of ginger looks a lot like the stomach it is renowned for settling.

Sweet potatoes – Sweet potatoes closely resemble the human pancreas, and help to stabilize the blood sugar levels of diabetics.

 

Recommended Articles

Herbal Teas

Five Herbal Teas and the Conditions They Can Help Treat

Herbal teas have been treasured for their tastes and healing properties by virtually all civilizations on Earth since prehistoric times. Rich in antioxidants, full in flavor, and free from undesirable ingredients, you're seldom likely to find a natural health expert who doesn't recommended them. However, the herbal tea market is undeniably saturated, and new buyers often don't know which … Read more

Cardamom

Five Warming Spices That Raise Our Body Temperature

One of the easiest and healthiest ways for us to stay warm during the coldest times of the year is to eat more so-called "warming" foods. Warming foods, which ancient Chinese medicine referred to as "yang" foods, are foods that contain one or more active compounds that help raise our core temperature – often by boosting blood circulation or removing excess water from our tissues. Seeds, … Read more

Chilies

Four Foods That Lower Blood Pressure

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 67 million Americans – approximately one in three adults – suffer from hypertension, or high blood pressure. In 2009 alone, high blood pressure was the primary or contributing cause of almost 350,000 deaths in the United States, which averages at 1,000 deaths per day. The disorder is, in essence, an epidemic in the … Read more

Chopping Kale

A List of Foods Rich in Vitamin K: From Kale to Spring Onions

Vitamin K is the name given to a group of fat-soluble vitamins that are primarily responsible for aiding blood clot formation in our bodies. In fact, the reason why vitamin K was never named vitamin F (the next logical step after vitamin E) was to emphasize its central role in blood health: the "K" actually stands for "koagulation," the German word for "clotting."In healthier times, … Read more